Recently by Glen Boyd

The Zodiac Killer DVD Review: To Catch a Killer...Or Not

It seems the idea behind the making of The Zodiac Killer all along was to actually catch him.
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The Zodiac serial murder case, which terrorized Northern California during the late 1960s going into the early 1970s, ranks alongside Jack The Ripper and D.B. Cooper as one of the most notorious, still unsolved crimes in history. Over the decades since, the killer who called himself The Zodiac has spawned a cult of personality amongst armchair detectives who continue even now to posit their theories on an ever-increasing number of websites and blogs. The story behind the grisly killing spree boasts a strikingly bizarre narrative - even as serial murder cases go. There have been a number of books and

Album Review: ELP: Once Upon A Time In South America (4-CD Set)

The 1993 & 1997 reunion tour concerts showcase an ELP trying to pick up the pieces following more than a decade in the wilderness.
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Emerson Lake & Palmer (or ELP as they've also been often billed - including on this live recording, drawn from a series of shows in South America, two dates from a 1993 reunion tour and one from 1997) are one of those bands who have gotten kind of a bad rap over the years. Even during their 1970s heyday - when they were one of the top drawing live acts in the world, riding a string of mega-selling albums including Trilogy and Brain Salad Surgery, they were still universally despised by the rock press. But even as the critics routinely

Gimme Danger DVD Review: Jim Jarmusch Pays Loving Tribute to Iggy and the Stooges, but Misses Some Opportunities

A long overdue official history lesson documenting the "greatest rock and roll band ever." Or, at least one of them.
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From the first few minutes of Gimme Danger, Jim Jarmusch's loving tribute to Iggy and the Stooges, the director makes his unabashed fandom abundantly clear - even going so far as to label them "the greatest rock and roll band ever " (a claim repeated numerous times throughout the film). While that label is debatable at best, there is still no denying the enormous influence of the Stooges on a subsequent generation of rock bands ranging from the Ramones and the Clash, to Sonic Youth and Nirvana. Jarmusch is of course no stranger to the rock-doc form, with a resume

Snowden DVD Review: Joseph Gordon Levitt's Performance is a Fun Thing to Watch

Oliver Stone plays it straight with the surprisingly subtle, subdued, and nuanced docu-drama Snowden.
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Oliver Stone has a well-documented history of adapting real-life historical events into films that often thread a finely woven, but shadowy web of conspiracy and paranoia that dares the audience to question what is actually real and what is more likely theatrically imagined. In movies like JFK and Nixon, Stone has also occasionally displayed a tendency to play somewhat loose with the factual record, perhaps most notably with his - how shall we say? - "interesting" recounting of the Jim Morrison story in The Doors, parts of which were openly disputed by the surviving band members themselves. With Edward Snowden,

Man Of The World: The Peter Green Story DVD Review

An often fascinating, but equally frustrating study of the guitarist and songwriter, once spoken of in the same breath as guitar-Gods like Clapton, Page, and Hendrix.
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If you know your rock history, you know that before there was the soft-rock hit machine of Rumours-era Fleetwood Mac, there was "the other Fleetwood Mac," a much different sounding animal (and then some) than the one you most likely remember now. During a brief, three-year stretch that ran from roughly 1968 through about 1970, the British blues-rock band known first as Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac (before dropping the Green name at his own request), recorded three well-received albums, including the classic Then Play On. But then, just as they seemed on the threshold of a Led Zeppelin sized breakthrough

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