Results tagged “Warner Archive”

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Celebrates at Comic-Con@Home 2020

Online panels held for Bugs Bunny's 80th Anniversary, Secret Origins of Saturday Morning Cartoons, and Deep Blue Sea 3.
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Press release: Warner Bros. Home Entertainment (WBHE) brings three entertaining panels to showcase at Comic-Con@Home, the all-virtual 2020 edition of the world’s largest comic and pop culture festival. The WBHE presentations coming this weekend - July 23-26 - will feature stars, filmmakers and animation experts celebrating the 80th anniversary of the legendary Bugs Bunny, exploring the secret origins of iconic Saturday morning cartoons, and giving fans a preview of the upcoming original film, Deep Blue Sea 3. Here’s a description of each of the panels, including the participants: Bugs Bunny’s 80th Anniversary Extravaganza — Take a trip through eight decades

Saturday Program Highlights for San Diego Comic-Con@Home 2020

What will the Sentries be watching?
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The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the lives of many folks around the globe, including those who had planned to attend this year's San Diego Comic-Con. Its cancellation was a great disappointment but the resourceful folks behind the scenes are putting on a virtual convention by hosting a variety of panels over the dates the convention was supposed to occur. According to their site: Comic-Con@Home 2020 will feature over 350 separate panels spread out over all five days of the event. There will be something for everyone! Here’s how it works: Once the daily schedules go live, you’ll be able to

Legion of Superheroes: The Complete Series Coming to Blu-ray Via Warner Archive

One thousand years from now, the legendary Man of Steel inspires a group of emerging young heroes from the 31st century to band together and defend the newly formed United Planets.
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Press release: Warner Archive Collection continues its proud tradition of distributing the best of Warner Bros. Animation’s robust library of DC-based productions with the release of Legion of Superheroes: The Complete Series on Blu-ray starting July 14, 2020. Pre-orders are now available via wbshop.com and your favorite online retailer. Presented in full 16x9 widescreen across three Blu-ray discs, Legion of Superheroes: The Complete Series includes all 26 episodes of the popular show, which aired on The CW from 2006-2008, as well as a pair of bonus features: the involving featurette "We Are Legion"; and an Exclusive Audio Commentary on the

Tex Avery Screwball Classics Volume 1 Blu-ray Review: A Must-Own for Animation Fans

In these 19 cartoons, gags fly rapidly, and the rules of physics and the medium are thrown out the window.
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When it comes to the work of legendary animation director Fred “Tex” Avery, the stories typically show order giving way to chaos, which may explain why the 19 cartoons on Warner Archive Collection's Tex Avery Screwball Classics Volume 1 from his tenure at MGM aren't listed chronologically. Though some collectors may find this screwy, the amount of laughter provided should more than make up for any obsessive-compulsive anxiety caused by the randomness. Avery first made a significant impact on the medium during his time at Warner Brothers, working on Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies. While there, he was involved with

Teen Titans: The Complete Series Coming to Blu-ray on December 3, 2019

Warner Archive Collection remasters beloved DC super hero series.
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Press release: Continuing its dedication to mining and remastering the best of Warner Bros. Animation’s deep library of super hero productions, Warner Archive Collection proudly presents Teen Titans: The Complete Series on Blu-ray starting December 3, 2019. Single Season volumes are also available. Pre-orders are now available via wb.com/warnerarchive and your favorite online retailer. It's a full plate of crime-fighting and chaos as Robin, Cyborg, Starfire, Raven and Beast Boy go up against killer villains such as Brother Blood, Mad Mod and their archenemy Slade. Get ready for all the big battles and unbreakable bonds that make these friends the

The Koker Trilogy is the Pick of the Week

The late master Kiarostami's influential trilogy rounds out a week of stellar new releases.
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When master filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami passed away in 2016, that really shook the film world, because his extraordinary body of work really elevated the endless possibilites of how bold and innovative Cinema can be. His blending of reality and fiction became a touchstone for the depiction of the human condition. From his short films of the early '70s to his final masterpiece, 24 Frames (2017), Kiarostami really changed the face of contemporary Iranian film forever. He never made a bad film, and it's no wonder why critics and film buffs (besides myself) still sing his praises today, and discuss how

Wally Gator: The Complete Series DVD Review: Delightfully Silly, Don't Y'know

Best in small doses because of the similarity of the plots.
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As part of the Hanna Barbera Classic Collection, the Warner Archive Collection has released Wally Gator: The Complete Series. The two-disc release presents the 52 cartoons the character starred in, which first appeared as part of The Hanna-Barbera New Cartoon Series on ABC from September 3, 1962 - August 30, 1963. Wally Gator was one of a trio of cartoons the series aired. The other two were Lippy the Lion & Hardy Har Har and Touché Turtle and Dum Dum. The series is similar to Hanna Barbera's hit cartoon Yogi Bear (1961-1962). Wally Gator is a hat-collar-and-cuff wearing anthropomorphic alligator

Klute is the Pick of the Week

A gritty '70s masterwork leads a week of interesting releases.
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The 1970s was a hugely groundbreaking decade for film. During this decade, Cinema reflected on the aftermath of Vietnam, the Watergate scandal, women's rights, and the uncertainty of more political unrest. Director Alan J. Pakula reflected this with his unofficial 'paranoid trilogy', which included 1974's The Parallax View and 1976's All The President's Men. However, his 1971 neo-noir thriller, Klute, started it all. It's a film about menace, uncertainty, but also a woman's place in the world. That woman is Bree Daniels (Jane Fonda), a self-liberated call girl who's given one trick too many, and finds herself on the wrong

Hedwig and the Angry Inch is the Pick of the Week

John Cameron Mitchell's 2001 cult classic rounds out a pretty great week of new releases.
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Being that this is still Pride month, I think John Cameron Mitchell's Hedwig and the Angry Inch (2001) makes sense as my Pick of the Week. Although I have only seen the first half of the film, I know that it definitely compares to Rocky Horror as the new Midnight Movie, but with more emotional and oddly realistic poignancy. It also captures the spirit of rock and roll and how it connects within the soul of people who really desire their own voice. In terms of today's unholy and misguided transphobia, I think the film stomps the usual stereotypes to

The Thing from Another World Blu-ray Review: A Classic of the Sci-fi Genre

Available from Warner Archive, the Blu-ray offers impressive high-def video and pleasing audio.
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Based on John W. Campbell's 1938 novella “Who Goes There?” The Thing from Another World (1951) tells the story of those at arctic outpost Polar Expedition Six dealing with a plant-based humanoid alien (James Arness) that feeds on blood, no matter if it's human or animal. Understandably once the titular creature starts to kill, Air Force Captain Pat Hendry (Kenneth Tobey) wants the thing destroyed. However, not only must he and his men battle against this powerful thing, which is immune to bullets, but also against head scientist Dr. Arthur Carrington (Robert Cornthwaite), who has different ideas on how to

The Prize (1963) Blu-ray Review: Lots of Talent, Big Disappointment

The Prize could have been a bonafide classic under a different director, instead it's just ok, but mostly forgettable.
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Based upon a popular novel by Irving Wallace, The Prize (1963) was written by six-time Academy Award-nominee Ernest Lehman and stars Hollywood hot-shot Paul Newman and Hollywood heavyweight Edward G. Robinson. It was shot on location in exotic Stockholm. It is a tale of intrigue, mistaken identities, spies, and murder. It should have been a bonafide classic. Were it directed by someone like Alfred Hitchcock or Orson Welles, it would have been. Instead, it was helmed by Mark Robson and we got a film that’s just okay and mostly forgettable. Newman plays Andrew Craig, a writer who is beloved by

Year of the Dragon Blu-ray Review: An Underrated Cop Thriller

Warner Archive gives a solid Blu-ray upgrade to Michael Cimino’s edgy crime thriller.
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Michael Cimino may have never had another critical and/or commercial success after The Deer Hunter, but that doesn’t mean he, at least, made some films that are still worthy of a conversation piece. Heaven’s Gate was a giant bomb in 1980, but it is still talked about and gets new restored versions of it every so often - with the most recent being a 2012 release from The Criterion Collection of the film in all its three hours-plus glory. Year of the Dragon may not have the same reputation as Heaven’s Gate does of being a costly, box office failure

Warner Archive Collection at WonderCon 2019

Surprise guests join trio of exciting WAC panels over WonderCon weekend.
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Press release: Warner Archive Collection (WAC) presents a trio of exhilarating panels at WonderCon over the March 29-31 weekend in Anaheim with the focus on newly-remastered, coming-to-Blu-ray presentations of the original Man From Atlantis TV movie pilot and the entire original Jonny Quest animated series, plus a special 10th anniversary celebration of Warner Archive Collection itself. WAC’s guest panelists include an extraordinary array of talent ranging from Man From Atlantis star Patrick Duffy and Shazam! TV series heartthrob Michael Gray to renowned voice actress Julie Nathanson and Daniel Zaldivar, the original voice of Hadji on Jonny Quest. WAC’s programming for

Brewster McCloud Blu-ray Review: A Weird, Strange Trip into the Altmanverse

Robert Altman's follow-up to M*A*S*H is an idiosyncratic, weird little film that only he could make.
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After spending a decade or so making industrial films then directing television episodes, Robert Altman finally connected with critics and audiences on a feature film. Released in 1970, M*A*S*H, a satirical account of a medical unit in the Korean War, was a smash hit. It won awards, made big money (and spawned a hugely successful TV series), and put Altman on the map as an exciting filmmaker. With the success of M*A*S*H, the studios gave Altman a green light to make any film he wanted. He chose the hottest screenplay around, Brewster McCloud, a black comedy about a New York

Popeye The Sailor: The 1940s, Volume 1 Blu-ray Review: Impressive Visuals but Disappointing Audio

After 10 years, completists will certainly be glad Warner Archive is continuing the release of Popeye cartoons.
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From July 2007 through November 2008, Warner Brothers released three volumes of Popeye the Sailor cartoons on DVD, which contained the first 123 cartoons from Popeye the Sailor (1933) through to Cartoons Ain't Human (1943). Aside from three Popeye Color Specials, two-reelers shot in Technicolor, those cartoons were in black and white. Now 10 years later, Warner Archive is continuing the run with Popeye The Sailor: The 1940s Volume 1, featuring the next 14 theatrical cartoons made by Famous Studios, all in Technicolor, from Her Honor the Mare (1943) through to Mess Production (1945). For those new to the Popeye

Condemned! | The Devil to Pay! DVD Reviews: Both Worthy of Exclamation Points

The Warner Archive Collection dusts off two pre-Code Ronald Colman classics featuring Ann Harding, Loretta Young, Myrna Loy, and a familiar-looking terrier.
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Once again, the Warner Archive Collection has unveiled a couple of forgotten titles starring Ronald Colman, the British-born talent who transcended from stage to silents to talkies with the greatest of ease, resulting in three Oscar-nominations during his 40+ career in the world of entertainment. Here, the WAC presents us with two pre-Code rarities ‒ a serious drama and a madcap comedy ‒ both of which are well worth the cost of admission. Condemned! (1929, United Artists) Set on the isle of Cayenne ‒ the infamous French penal colony better known as "Devil's Island", from whence Humphrey Bogart would repeatedly

San Diego Comic-Con International 2018 Review: Go for the Comics, Stay for the Stories

Another year of Con but this time it's the Big Picture
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Is it as easy as copy and paste? If you have followed my writings even tangentially over the past eight years, you know I thrive on two things - consistency and nostalgia. I attend many of the same panels each year, like reuniting with old friends or watching an old familiar film for comfort. The annual gathering of misfits known as the San Diego Comic-Con International brings together tribes from all over the world. If you're there - badge or not, costume or not, Captain America shield, Batman mask, or Stormtrooper helmet - you are among your brethren. Usually this

Lights of New York (1928) DVD Review: The Most Sublime Milestone in Cinema

The Warner Archive Collection brings us the first all-talking motion picture ever, which deserves a look-see for that very reason alone.
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Given that even the cheapest films produced today can be presented in faux widescreen with 7-channel surround sound and special effects manufactured entirely via computer software, it's extremely easy to take some of cinema's most important milestones for granted. Much like the very first motion pictures to be shot digitally as far back as the early 2000s have already faded from the memory of the general public, the movies which introduced the world to surround (let alone stereo) sound and the phenomenon once known as CinemaScope have become little more than mere footnotes in cinematic history. One such milestone ‒

Fireman, Save My Child (1932) DVD Review: Old Hatter Up

Joe E. Brown strikes out in a tired pre-Code baseball comedy now available from the Warner Archive Collection.
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Admittedly, a movie from the early '30s is bound to feel more than just a tad bit outdated when viewed today. That said, Lloyd Bacon's Fireman, Save My Child ‒ a First National Pictures comedy starring the mouth himself, Joe E. Brown ‒ was already old hat (or old fire helmet, as it were) when it was released by Warner Bros. in late February of 1932, as it had already been made twice before during the Silent Era. The first film to carry the title was Hal Roach's one-reel short from 1918 with the great Harold Lloyd in the lead,

Alexander Hamilton (1931) DVD Review: I Never Expect to See a Perfect Work Anyway

An entirely-too-old George Arliss portrays a much younger Hamilton in this early pre-Code biopic from the Warner Archive Collection.
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Far removed from the musical stage sensation of today, the 1917 Broadway production of Hamilton presented audiences with a condensed version of the first Secretary of the Treasury's battle to pass his Assumption Bill funding act in the years following the end of the Revolutionary War. With very little else in-between. But that didn't seem to matter much to the public, who were probably more excited to see recent Academy Award winner George Arliss ‒ the first (and youngest) English-born actor to earn such an honor in the US ‒ parading about amid a compelling human drama he himself had
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