Results tagged “Horror”

In Search of Dracula Blu-ray Review: A Bloody Good Documentary

Before he was Saruman, Christopher Lee starred ten times as Dracula. He narrates this informative feature-length exploration of the infamous count and the history of the vampire.
  |   Comments
In Search of Dracula, originally released in 1975, and directed by Calvin Floyd (Terror of Frankenstein, The Sleep of Death), has been remastered in 2K by Kino Lorber. A feature-length exploration of the infamous count and the history of the vampire, the documentary features archival footage, artwork, location photography (principally of Transylvania), as well as film clips from popular vampire films. Narrated by actor Christopher Lee, the film is both informative and entertaining. Before he was Saruman, Christopher Lee starred ten times as Dracula, starting in 1958 with Horror of Dracula (widely considered one of the best Dracula films), and

The Wolf House Movie Review: Child's Imagination Meets Real-life Horror

Masquerade as propaganda, the Chilean film marries horror with a child's imagination, and the result is equally appalling and spectacular.
  |   Comments
The Wolf House is 73 minutes of "Wow! How did they pull off?". The startling stop-motion animation, which bestows 'awe!' after 'awe!' every minute is only one of the pillars that hold this astonishing form of story-telling. Masquerading as a propaganda film to cleanse the ill-reputation of Colonia Dignidad, an isolated community formed by German fugitive Paul Schäfer, there's more to the film than what appears, although it draws little from the real-life incidents, on the surface. The community, which was legally bound for agriculture activities, became infamous for the torture, internment, and murders that came to light a few

The Other Lamb Movie Review: A Surface-Level Lucid Nightmare

A flawed yet nostalgic homage to '70s horror lore and simultaneous grim allegory for the trials of adolescence.
  |   Comments
The Other Lamb follows the journey of Selah (Raffey Cassidy), a girl who was born into an all-female cult called The Flock led by a man known only as Shepherd (Michael Huisman). But once the police visit their commune in the woods far from civilization, Selah suddenly starts questioning both her place within the cult and Shepherd’s ulterior motives. Selah’s journey of self-discovery ends up becoming an amalgam of classic '70s religious horror films. With its storyline involving an insidious cult, The Other Lamb is almost like The Wicker Man but strictly from the cult’s point of view and without

Paramount Pictures Announces 'A Quiet Place' Double Feature Fan Event in Advance of 'A Quiet Place Part II' Opening

In A Quiet Place Part II, the Abbott family must now face the terrors of the outside world as they continue their fight for survival in silence.
  |   Comments
Press release: Paramount Pictures today announced that on Wednesday, March 18th, it will be offering fans of A Quiet Place the chance to relive the original film in select theatres and be the first to go beyond the path and experience the next installment, A Quiet Place Part II before it arrives in theatres nationwide, Friday, March 20th. Tickets for the double feature go on sale today, as ticketing launches nationwide for A Quiet Place Part II at https://www.aquietplacemovie.com/ Tickets can also be purchased at the box office at participating locations. The start time for the double feature is 7:00PM

Deadly Manor Blu-ray Review: A Complete and Total Dud

I'm not one prone to hyperbole but Deadly Manor might be the stupidest movie I've ever seen.
  |   Comments
A group of teenagers decides to go camping at the lake. Four of them are in a Jeep, two drive a motorcycle (this will be important later). None of them seem to know where it is. The one guy who has been there before only has vague notions. No one even knows what the lake is called. They can’t find it on a map. Someone suggests that maybe it is too small to be on one. They pick up a scraggly looking hitchhiker. He says he knows where that lake is. He doesn’t say where he is going but he

My Bloody Valentine (1981) Blu-ray Review: Superb Slasher Restored

One of the best '80s slasher films, My Bloody Valentine returns to Blu-ray with newly restored video and audio.
  |   Comments
My Bloody Valentine was, if not quite a box-office bomb, a severe disappointment. It was released right at the height of the slasher craze, a year after Friday the 13th had directly copied the formula of John Carpenter's wildly successful Halloween, upped the gore factor, and turned what was a phenomenon into an entire genre. Cheap and easy to make, most slasher movies were throwaways, only interesting in their sometimes innovative and gruesome special effects. And despite hitting the basic tropes spot on (takes place on a holiday, has a masked killer in an interesting costume, and plenty of "teenagers"

Edge of the Axe Blu-ray Review: Careful with That Axe, Psycho Killer

Arrow Video presents this late entry into the slasher genre that spends too much time developing character when it should be chopping up bodies with an axe.
  |   Comments
It is always fascinating to me when the makers of low-budget slasher films try to inject their films with an actual story and well-developed characters. This seems rather pointless when all fans of the genre want is attractive people being hacked to death in creative ways. This is especially interesting as the majority of people who make low-budget slasher films wouldn’t know an interesting story if it slapped them in the face with a black leather glove, nor a well-developed character if it stabbed them in the eye with a shiny, sharp knife. Edge of the Axe is a Spanish-American

Rabid (2019) Blu-ray Giveaway

The Soska Sisters’ new take on David Cronenberg’s classic.
  |   Comments
Press release: Cinema Sentries has teamed up with Scream Factory to award one lucky reader Rapid on Blu-ray. For those wanting to learn more, read the press release below: Rabid comes to Blu-ray from Scream Factory on February 4, 2020, and includes an audio commentary with directors & writers Jen & Sylvia Soska, an interview with actress Laura Vandervoot, and the theatrical trailer. A gruesome accident ... an experimental treatment ... an unstoppable nightmare. Jen and Sylvia Soska bring you a terrifying new take on the legendary David Cronenberg's Rabid. Demure and unassuming fashion designer Sarah (Laura Vandervoort, Jigsaw), horribly

Zombi Child Movie Review: A Slow Exploration of Voodoo and Adolescence

A meditative zombie flick that revitalizes the genre while simultaneously exploring its origins.
  |   Comments
With Zombi Child, director Bertrand Bonello pulls off both a reinvigoration of the zombie genre and a reclaiming of its origins. Over the years, people have associated zombies with their hunger for human flesh and loss of morality and consciousness once they become zombified. But Bonello aims to make a meditative horror drama about colonialism and adolescence. Zombi Child follows two different storylines. One set in Haiti 1962 involving Clairvius Narcisse (Mackenson Bijou), the most famous victim of the practice called zombieism who was drugged and sold into slavery while in a susceptible mind set. The other storyline is set

The Lighthouse Blu-ray Review: A Shining Beacon of Excellence

A two-hander where your two hands will be firmly embedded in your armrests.
  |   Comments
I wasn’t at all familiar with director and co-writer Robert Eggers until this masterful sophomore effort, but immediately added his debut, The Witch, to my must-see queue after falling under the spell of The Lighthouse. The film really shouldn’t work, and yet it’s about as close to perfection as I encountered in last year’s film slate. It’s a dialogue-rich two-hander that is so stage-ready it’s just missing spotlights, it’s a twisted cerebral thriller with some insane freak-out moments, and it’s filmed on actual film in black and white in a nearly-square 1.19:1 aspect ratio that legitimately makes it seem like

The Sonata Movie Review: Safe, Self-aware, and Focussed

It marries the physical and mental facets of horror.
  |   Comments
A little question strikes me every time I watch a horror movie. Do horror movies exist in the universe of other horror movies? Isn't it quite apparent that an old mansion in the woods is a set up for the upcoming horror? The person entering it should be aware of it or at the least, shed little doubt, provided he/she has seen at least one horror movie in their life. Andrew Desmond's The Sonata has a quite interesting treatment. The evident intent of horror films would be to scare the living shit out of the audience. Some choose jump scares,

IT Chapter Two Blu-ray Review: We All Bloat Down Here

In which Pennywise, the shapeshifting killer clown, strikes back! And scares no one.
  |   Comments
IT is back. The Losers Club, a tight-knit group of kids—good kids—with chips on their shoulders, humiliated Pennywise the dancing (and shapeshifting) killer clown (Bill Skarsgard), forcing him to hide in his hole. Now, 27 years later, Pennywise (he, she, “IT”) wakes from its slumber, hungry for flesh. Loser flesh. As conceived by director Andy Muschietti, Pennywise always looks and sounds demonic. But IT Chapter Two and its 2017 predecessor over-telegraph the evil. IT’s mouth drools. The head is bulbous, spider-like. The blood-tear makeup is sinister. Skarsgard goes all in to give us all kinds of creep. By comparison, the

Stephen King's Storm of the Century (1999) DVD Review: Intriguing Premise at Snail's Pace

Perhaps the best of the run of Stephen King TV movies, Storm is atmospheric, creepy, and slow, slow, slow.
  |   Comments
TV made sense as its own thing until about 20 years ago. Nowadays, what constitutes TV is so sprawling and broken up that it's not really one thing anymore. Twenty years ago, cable was not king, and there weren't that many networks (though, to understand the zeitgeist of TV criticism, one should note Bruce Springsteen could chart a single in 1992 called "57 Channels and Nothin' On") and so the big TV networks competed in splashy ways to get eyes-on, especially in sweeps weeks. Sweeps were the few times during the year, one a quarter, when the Nielsen Company processed

The Dead Center Blu-ray Review: Mostly Effective Psychological Horror

Primer's Shane Carruth stars in psychological and supernatural horror tale, where a suicide returns from the dead... but not alone.
  |   Comments
A spiral is integral to The Dead Center's imagery and story. A spiral appears on the photographs of a body from a crime scene, some sort of scar or lumps of tissue on his person. It wasn't seen in the autopsy because none was performed - the man breathes back to life on the gurney in the morgue, sneaks out, and ends up in a psychiatric ward. He was long dead when the paramedics brought him in; now he's catatonic, staring, and has become two doctors' problem: the medical examiner whose corpse has gone missing, and the psychiatrist who wants

Ringu Collection Blu-ray Review: Ghostly Revenge, Again and Again

Four weird, gripping and often terrifying films of spectral revenge that began the J-horror boom are now on Blu-ray.
  |   Comments
Horror as a genre tends to go through brief periods of inspiration, followed by long slogs of imitation. If you're unlucky, the inspired breakout hit is something like Saw, and as a horror fan you have to sit through years of vile dreck until something better comes along to rejigger the landscape. In the late '90s, horror was in one of its down-turn phases: the mid-'90s crackdown on letting youngsters into R-rated movies had the effect (still felt today) that to get the primary audience for horror, the young, you needed to be PG-13, which means violence has to be

Scars of Dracula Blu-ray Review: A Bit of a Retread but Still Enjoyable

While understandably not held in high regard, there's still some fun to be had seeing Lee back as the Count.
  |   Comments
Scars of Dracula is Hammer's sixth Dracula film and the fifth to feature Christopher Lee. It follows a familiar template: Dracula is resurrected, causes mayhem among the local citizenry, sets his sights--er, fangs on one particular lovely maiden, and is defeated in the end. It's one of the lesser of the series because it's a bit of a retread, but it was still enjoyable when one is in the mood for some classic horror. Scars opens in Dracula's castle, not the church where he died in the previous film, Taste the Blood of Dracula. As stated in the extras, this

Nightmare Beach Blu-ray Review: Somebody Wake Me Up

Slasher horror meets spring break comedy in this terrible '80s hybrid from schlock master Umberto Lenzi.
  |   Comments
If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to mix an ‘80s slasher with an ‘80s spring break comedy, then Umberto Lenzi’s Nightmare Beach is for you. Well, actually it isn’t for anybody because it is a terrible, terrible movie. It wasn’t even for Umberto Lenzi for he swears he didn’t direct it (at least according to IMDB trivia). He was signed on to direct but at the last minute decided it was too similar to one of his other films (Seven Blood Stained Orchids) and begged off the production. The credits name a “Harry Kilpatrick” as the director

Midsommar Blu-ray Review: Unsettling in Any Season

Ari Aster's follow-up to Hereditary confirms his unique talent.
  |   Comments
Midsommar is marketed as a horror film, but it’s so different from the typical entries in that genre that it really belongs in a category all its own. While there is a bit of stomach-churning gore and an overbearing sense of dread as writer/director Ari Aster leads us down his twisted rabbit hole, there’s also an intriguing anthropological study of an insular Swedish culture that reveals unexpected layers of beauty in its madness. Where most horror films increase their scares by incorporating night settings, Midsommar frightens viewers in the full light of day during a festival occurring during the season

The Prey Blu-ray Review: Pray You'll Never Have To Watch

Arrow Video does an excellent job presenting this should-have-been forgotten slasher in a very nice package.
  |   Comments
The 1980s were a great time for horror movies in general and slasher flicks in particular. With the advent of home video and the booming popularity of video rental stores, there was suddenly a need for more and more videos to stock those shelves. Lots of studios specializing in cheaply made, straight-to-video movies sprung up overnight. Horror fans are a motley lot and easily amused. They are not known for snobbish attitudes, willing to take a chance (and often enjoy) films of lower budget and artistic caliber. As long as the film has plenty of violence, at least some blood-soaked

Los Angeles' Secret Movie Club Unveils Festival of Horror Programming

Midnight screenings of seminal horror films, including John Carpenter’s Apocalypse Trilogy and two Dia De Los Muertos-themed screenings.
  |   Comments
Press release: The Los Angeles-based Secret Movie Club has officially unveiled the programming slate for its FESTIVAL OF HORROR film series, which will run throughout the month of October and culminate on November 2. The FESTIVAL OF HORROR films run the gamut from the classic (a FRANKENSTEIN/ BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN Universal Studios matinee double feature) to the contemporary (THE WITCH), and from the iconic (including a TWILIGHT ZONE MARATHON) to the obscure (a double feature of two films produced by Val Lewton for RKO Studios) and includes John Carpenter’s seminal APOCALYPSE TRILOGY. The FESTIVAL OF HORROR film series begins on
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22  

Follow Us