Results tagged “Criterion Collection”

Criterion Announces November 2018 Releases

Cinephiles will be getting quite a bounty of choices this month.
  |   Comments
In November, Criterion is releasing a few titles to be thankful for. They are Kenji Mizoguchi's A Story from Chikamatsu, Billy Wilder's Some Like It Hot, David Byrne's True Stories, Orson Welles’s The Magnificent Ambersons and Ingmar Bergman’s Cinema, which contains 39 films. Read on to learn more about them. A Story from Chikamatsu (#949) out Nov 6 One of a string of late-career masterworks made by Kenji Mizoguchi in the early 1950s, A Story from Chikamatsu (a.k.a. The Crucified Lovers) is an exquisitely moving tale of forbidden love struggling to survive in the face of persecution. Based on a

Dragon Inn Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: Villains Check In but They Don't Check Out

Fans of the genre will do themselves a favor if they plan a stop at Dragon Inn.
  |   Comments
King Hu's second entry into the Criterion Collection is Dragon Inn (1967), his first film after leaving the Shaw Brothers Studios in Hong King and moving to seek greater artistic liberties as a director in Taiwan. Set against a backdrop of political intrigue, writer/director Hu does very well with both job duties, creating visually interesting action sequences that blend into an entertaining story. Set in 1457 A.D. during China's Ming Dynasty, eunuchs led by Cao Shao-qin (Bai Ying), who is “unsurpassed in the martial arts,” seize power. This gives them control over two espionage agencies, the Eastern Depot and the

Criterion Announces October 2018 Releases

A lot of good titles might put a scare in your wallet.
  |   Comments
In October, Criterion is releasing five titles in high-definition. They are Rainer Werner Fassbinder Eight Hours Don’t Make a Day, Hal Ashby's Shampoo, and Rob Reiner's The Princess Bride. Getting HD upgrades are Brian De Palma's Sisters and Cornel Wilde's The Naked Prey. Read on to learn more about them. The Naked Prey (#415) out Oct 2 Glamorous leading man turned idiosyncratic auteur Cornel Wilde created in the 1960s and ’70s a handful of gritty, violent explorations of the nature of man, none more memorable than The Naked Prey. In the early nineteenth century, after an ivory-hunting safari offends a

Ingmar Bergman's Cinema in Honor of His 100th Birthday

A 30-disc Collector's Edition box set contains 39 films and a 248-page book available on Blu-ray November 20, 2018.
  |   Comments
Press release: Ingmar Bergman, the visionary storyteller who startled generations of art-house moviegoers with his stark intensity and naked pursuit of the most profound metaphysical questions, was born on July 14, 1918. In honor of the legendary Swedish filmmaker's one hundredth birthday, the Criterion Collection is launching an array of releases and programming to celebrate this incomparable body of work. At the heart of this centennial celebration is Ingmar Bergman's Cinema, a thirty-Blu-ray collector's edition box set, the most comprehensive collection of Bergman's work ever released on home video. Organized as a film festival-with opening and closing nights bookending double

Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: Portrait of the Artist As a Fascinating Man

Director Paul Schrader crafts a daring, spellbinding biography of Japanese writer Yukio Mishima.
  |   Comments
Yukio Mishima carved out a career as an esteemed playwright and author before ending his life by taking over a military facility and performing seppuku, a ritualistic form of suicide. Paul Schrader's daring film traces his life by having actors perform vignettes from some of Mishima's most famous works, painting a brilliant picture of this intriguing man. The film is notable not just for its subject but for its structure. After a brief color intro, it moves to black and white for the story of Mishima's childhood, then shifts to color for multiple vignettes that represent later stages of his

Criterion Announces September 2018 Releases

September is alright for upgrades.
  |   Comments
In September, some Criterion aficinados will have an opportunity to upgrade their favorite films as three of the five titles debut in high-definition. They are Ingmar Bergman's Scenes from a Marriage, Gregory La Cava's My Man Godfrey, and Andrei Tarkovsky's Andrei Rublev New to the collection are Olivier Assayas' Cold Water and Daniel Petrie's A Raisin in the Sun. Read on to learn more about them. Scenes from a Marriage (#229) out Sept 4 Scenes from a Marriage chronicles the many years of love and turmoil that bind Marianne and Johan, tracking their relationship through matrimony, infidelity, divorce, and subsequent

Criterion Announces August 2018 Releases

See what's coming before the kids head back to school.
  |   Comments
In August, Criterion is releasing five titles. New to the collection are Robert M. Young's The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez, Susan Seidelman's Smithereens, Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life, and Tomás Gutiérrez Alea's Memories of Underdevelopment and a high-definition upgrade of Ernst Lubitsch’s Heaven Can Wait. Read on to learn more about them. The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez (#940) out Aug 14 Forced to run from the Texas Rangers after a heated misunderstanding leads to the death of a lawman, Mexican American farmer Gregorio Cortez sets off in desperate flight, evading a massive manhunt on horseback for days. Producer-star Edward

Criterion Announces July 2018 Releases

These Criterion titles might affect your summer-vacation budget.
  |   Comments
In July, Criterion plans on releasing five new titles. The first is Dietrich & von Sternberg in Hollywood, a six-movie collection featuring work by Josef von Sternberg and actress Marlene Dietrich. That will be followed by Ron Shelton’s Bull Durham; King Hu's Dragon Inn; Steven Soderbergh's sex, lies, and videotape; and Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s A Matter of Life and Death. Read on to learn more about them. Dietrich & von Sternberg in Hollywood (#930) out July 3 Tasked by studio executives with finding the next great screen siren, visionary Hollywood director Josef von Sternberg joined forces with rising

Baal Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: Unbearable, Unflinching, and Savage

Fassbinder's mythic performance fuels this vicious depiction of West German's social malaise.
  |   Comments
When the legendary Rainer Werner Fassbinder died in 1982 at the age of 37, he really did leave behind an amazing body of work. He lived a hard life of drinking and drugs, but that didn't stop him from making films about human fragility and emotion. Also, he didn't just direct films. He also acted in many of them. His boorish, devil-may-care persona began with his 1969 feature debut, Love is Colder than Death, but it didn't reach its apotheosis until one year later in director Volker Schlondorff's controversial 1970 adaptation of Bertolt Brecht's 1918 debut play, BAAL. Fassbinder brilliantly

Criterion Announces June 2018 Releases

School might get out, but you don't need to stop learning about movies.
  |   Comments
In June, Criterion plans on releasing four new titles and a high-definition upgrade. Joining the collection are Lino Brocka's Manila in the Claws of Light, John Waters' Female Trouble, Víctor Erice's El Sur, and Michael Moore's Bowling for Columbine. Getting an upgrade is Ingmar Bergman’s The Virgin Spring. Read on to learn more about them. Manila in the Claws of Light (#926) out June 12 Lino Brocka broke through to international acclaim with this candid portrait of 1970s Manila, the second film in the director’s turn to more serious-minded filmmaking after building a career on mainstream films he described as

Elevator to the Gallows Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: Ruthless People

French director Louis Malle launched his award-winning career with this spellbinding crime thriller.
  |   Comments
Louis Malle’s directorial debut is notable for numerous reasons. He was only 24 years old at the time, fresh off a three-year stint working at sea with famed oceanographer Jacques Cousteau where he only had to “direct fish”, as he was frequently fond of recounting. He had no real pull in the film industry, and yet was able to land the already established actress Jeanne Moreau to star, as well as jazz titan Miles Davis to contribute a totally improvised score. His best accomplishment: the resulting film is a resounding success, largely thanks to his sure-handed direction of its mesmerizing

An Actor's Revenge Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: Kabuki Costumes in Modernist Cinema

Kon Ichikawa's remake of a '30s movie dresses a stagey plot in innovative cinematic stylings.
  |   Comments
Yukinojo, the kabuki female impersonator who gets the titular vengeance in Kon Ichikawa's An Actor's Revenge (1963), is a tough sell for a cinematic character. Heavily made up both onstage and off, never once dropping his female gestures and high-pitched voice, Kazuo Hasegawa's performance is definitely deeply committed. This, which according to the title card early in the film was his 300th film performance, is also a remake of a popular film from the '30s, also starring Kazuo Hasegawa. A Kazuo Hasegawa in his early 20s playing a female impersonator so mesmerizing that the most beautiful woman in Edo (Tokyo

The Hero Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: A Long Train Ride into the Soul of an Artist

A movie star reflects on his life and the compromises he made to get there.
  |   Comments
Arindam Mukherjee (Uttam Kumar), an enormously famous movie star, boards an overnight train from Calcutta to Delhi to receive a national award. There, he meets an interesting cast of characters including Aditi Sengupta (Sharmila Tagore), a young journalist who edits a modern women’s magazine. She is contemptuous towards egotistical movie stars like him, but decides to secretly interview him as an expose to draw in readers. She wanders over to him in the dining car pretending to want an autograph for her niece and because she’s pretty and the journey is long, he begins talking to her freely. Over the

Criterion Announces May 2018 Releases

May is for film lovers.
  |   Comments
In May, Criterion plans on releasing seven titles, including two high-definition upgrades. New to the collection are Frank Borzage's Moonrise, Aki Kaurismäki's The Other Side of Hope, John Schlesinger's Midnight Cowboy, two by Cristian Mungiu. Beyond the Hills and Graduation. Getting an upgrade are Paul Schrader’s Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters and Robert Bresson's Au hasard Balthazar. Read on to learn more about them. Moonrise (#921) out May 8 A small-town fable about violence and redemption, Moonrise is the final triumph of Frank Borzage, one of Hollywood’s most neglected masters. Stigmatized from infancy by the fate of his criminal

Jabberwocky Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: A Frabjous Film! Callooh! Callay!

It's an amusing adventure filled with Terry Gilliam's humor and sensibilities that showcases his directorial aesthetic.
  |   Comments
After co-directing Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Terry Gilliam returned to the Dark Ages for his first solo outing, Jabberwocky, a fantasy tale inspired by Lewis Carroll's poem of the same name. It's an amusing adventure filled with Gilliam's humor and sensibilities that showcases his directorial aesthetic. Those expecting a sequel to the Python's madcap comedy classic will be disappointed, like many of the characters who live in the world of Jabberwocky. A deadly monster roams the forest as the audience and a fox hunter (Terry Jones) find out in the opening scene. Dennis (Michael Palin), not Holy Grail's

Kameradschaft Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: A Cry for Cooperation

Pabst's 1931 mine disaster film is swiftly paced, beautifully shot, and a heartfelt plea for comradeship between nations.
  |   Comments
It's difficult to separate Kameradschaft from its historical context. Released in 1931, this story of cooperation between French and Germans in a mining disaster on the border came out just two years before the Nazis gained electoral power in Germany. It was a time of street fighting and political instability, and apparently not a time when German audiences wanted to see a heartfelt plea for international community (according to the Luc Sante essay that accompanies this Criterion Collection release, it played to empty houses on release). Director G.W. Pabst's film was a cry in the dark, unheard and unheeded. So,

Westfront 1918 Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: Unglamorously Shows War the Way That It Is

A harrowing, if slightly polished, depiction of the sheer horrors of war.
  |   Comments
When depicting war, no other medium can do it as mercilessly as film. War movies can be as dire and depressing as real-life war, especially when showing the emotional and physical toll that can inflict on soldiers. There are those as savage as Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket, Oliver Stone's Platoon, and Elem Klimov's very disturbing Come and See. Then there are those as highly emotional as Terrence Malick's The Thin Red Line and Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan. However, director G.W. Pabst's 1930 early sound film, Westfront 1918, is a mixture of both. The film centers on four infantrymen: Karl (Gustav

Criterion Announces April 2018 Releases

No fooling. Here's what's coming.
  |   Comments
In April, Criterion plans on releasing five titles, including a new entry in the Eclipse Series. New to the collection are Leo McCarey's The Awful Truth, Sergei Parajanov’s The Color of Pomegranates, Jim Jarmusch's Dead Man, and Sofia Coppola's The Virgin Suicides, and Eclipse Series 46: Ingrid Bergman’s Swedish Years. Read on to learn more about them. Eclipse Series 46: Ingrid Bergman’s Swedish Years out Apr 10 Ingrid Bergman appeared in ten films in her native Sweden before the age of twenty-five, and while that work tends to be overshadowed by her time in Hollywood, it showcases the actor summoning

The Breakfast Club Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: Don't You Forget About These Bonus Features

Criterion's new edition of the classic '80s film is packed with hours of fascinating bonus features.
  |   Comments
While The Breakfast Club is justifiably revered as a classic teen film, primarily due to the involvement of masterful writer/director John Hughes, its insightful approach to teen angst makes it just as timely today as it was the ‘80s. Hughes understood more than any of his contemporaries that teens aren’t just stereotypical comic fodder, they’re universally relatable when treated as complex characters. In Criterion’s expansive new Blu-ray release, hours of bonus features delve into the production details and legacy of this important work. The setup of the film is so simple that it seems more like a play. Five high

General Idi Amin Dada: A Self-Portrait Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review

An important look at unchecked power, racism, nativism, and violence though the eyes of a dictator.
  |   Comments
General Idi Amin Dada: A Self-Portrait is the 1974 documentary film by Barbet Schroeder. Schroeder, who is known for such films as Bar Fly and Single White Female, began his filmmaking career making documneteries. In 1974, Schroeder struck a deal with a television network who was making one-hour shows about heads of state around the world. The network agreed to let him make his film first and in return give them enough footage from the shoot to turn it into a one-hour show. Schroeder and his crew traveled to Uganda to document the notorius Amin who had been in power
2 3 4 5 6  

Follow Us