Results tagged “Criterion Collection”

The Kid Brother Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: A Comedic Gem

Harold Lloyd's slapstick masterpiece gets a fantastic upgrade from the folks at Criterion.
  |   Comments
I’m not too familiar with the work of Harold Lloyd, and The Kid Brother is actually the first film of his that I’ve seen in its entirety. Of course, now that I’ve finally experienced one of his films, it makes me want to go and seek out what else he has done. The Kid Brother is a hysterical comedy from the silent era, and also one that has a strong emotional core and a few exciting action scenes. It’s the perfect genre blend of a movie, one that is hard to come by in modern Hollywood. Lloyd plays Harold Hickory,

Criterion Announces July 2019 Releases

Declare your independence from streaming and buy these in July.
  |   Comments
Do the right thing and add these July titles to your home library. New to the collection are Agnieszka Holland’s Europa Europa, Marcel Pagnol's The Baker’s Wife, Alan J. Pakula's Klute, and Michael Radford’s 1984. Getting Blu-ray Rainer Werner Fassbinder's The BRD Trilogy and Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing. Read on to learn more about them. The BRD Trilogy (#203) out Jul 4 In 1977, German director Rainer Werner Fassbinder was thirty-two years old and had already directed more than twenty-five feature films. That summer, he embarked on a project to trace the postwar history of West Germany in

Criterion Announces June 2019 Releases

Criterion helps with the June Gloom through this roster of releases.
  |   Comments
Here's what film fans can look for to in June. New to the collection are George Stevens's Swing Time, two by Bruno Dumont: L’humanité and La vie de Jésus, John Cameron Mitchell's Hedwig and the Angry Inch, and Sergei Bondarchuk’s War and Peace. Three films released separately from Ingmar Bergman's Cinema, A Film Trilogy by Ingmar Bergman includes Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light, and The Silence. Read on to learn more about them. A Film Trilogy by Ingmar Bergman (#208) out Jun 4 In 1960, Swedish director Ingmar Bergman began work on three of his most powerful and representative

The Magnificent Ambersons Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: A Flawed Masterpiece, but Still a Worthwhile Film

The Criterion Collection has stacked this beautiful release of Welles's troubled second production with a plethora of extras.
  |   Comments
Before getting into the history of the film: the mangling by the studio, the likely deliberately destroyed edited footage, and all of that intrigue, first we have to see the movie itself: The Magnificent Ambersons, Orson Welles's follow-up to his explosive debut Citizen Kane. Based on a novel by Booth Tarkington about the downfall of a noveau riche mid-Western family, The Magnificent Ambersons has elements of drama and comedy and some sense of tragedy, but most of all it is the portrait of a changing country, and world. George Amberson, the only son of Isabel and heir to the fortune,

Shame Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: A Harrowing, Nightmarish Bergman Masterpiece

As unflinchingly honest and unforgiving as a film can ever get.
  |   Comments
War is Hell. They're have been many films that tackled the often difficult subject of war, and its effects on humanity. And arguably none come more terrifying and brutal than Ingmar Bergman 1968's stunner, Shame. Although less remembered than some of his other films, such as The Seventh Seal, Persona, and Cries and Whispers, it's no less harsh and bleak, as well as unflinchingly honest and unforgiving as a film can ever get. Bergman mainstays and film legends Liv Ullmann and Max Von Sydow star as Eva and Jon Rosenberg, former musicians who escape the city engulfed in a civil

Criterion Announces May 2019 Releases

Read on to learn more about them.
  |   Comments
Here's what film fans can look for to in May. New to the collection are William Wyler's The Heiress, Michael Haneke’s Funny Games, Claire Denis's Let the Sunshine In, David Lynch's Blue Velvet, and Agnès Varda’s One Sings, the Other Doesn’t. Getting a Blu-ray upgrade: David Mamet's House of Games. Read on to learn more about them. The Heiress (#974) out May 7 Directed with a keen sense of ambiguity by William Wyler, this film based on a hit stage adaptation of Henry James’s Washington Square pivots on a question of motive. When shy, fragile Catherine Sloper (Olivia de Havilland,

The Princess Bride Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: As Good As You Wish

So well crafted, it is equally one of the best comedies, one of the best adventures, and one of the best love stories.
  |   Comments
Based on the novel by William Goldman, who also wrote the screenplay, Rob Reiner's The Princess Bride is a fantasy adventure filled with humor and romance that became an instant classic in the hearts of many who saw it. When a young boy (Fred Savage) is sick in bed, his grandfather (Peter Falk) comes over to continue a family tradition by reading him The Princess Bride. The young man is not overly thrilled about having to sit through a romance, but he gives his grandfather the benefit of the doubt. The film then cuts to the book's story introducing the

Mikey and Nicky Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: Elaine May Should Be Unanimously Acclaimed

A very underappreciated masterpiece of toxic masculinity and bleak relationships.
  |   Comments
When it comes to underappreciated figures of film, none are more legendary and important than Elaine May. After a successful series of improvisational comedy routines from the 1950s with the late, great Mike Nichols, she later developed a career as a very talented director and screenwriter with a deft and savage eye for complicated relationships. Even with brilliant films such as A New Leaf (1971), The Heartbreak Kid (1972), and her 1976 masterpiece, Mikey and Nicky, she continues to be often overlooked, because apparently, filmmaking only belongs to men. This should never be the case, because when talking about May,

Criterion Announces April 2019 Releases

I pity the fool who doesn't find something to buy this month.
  |   Comments
You'd be a fool to miss out on these April releases from Criterion. New to the collection are Jan Němec's Diamonds of the Night, Elia Kazan's A Face in the Crowd, Jackie Chan's Police Story and Police Story 2, and Gillian Armstrong's My Brilliant Career. Two by Jim Jarmusch are getting a Blu-ray upgrade: Stranger Than Paradise and Night on Earth. Read on to learn more about them. Stranger Than Paradise (#400) out Apr 9 With this breakout film, Jim Jarmusch established himself as one of the most exciting voices in the burgeoning independent-film scene, a road-movie poet with an

A Dry White Season Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: Truly Gripping Cinema

An unflinching and sadly relevant drama of violence and ongoing oppression.
  |   Comments
Racism is one those things that just doesn't seem to go away. Every day you turn on the news to find more unarmed black men being shot by white cops; white people calling the police on innocent black people, and the underestimation of Black Lives Matter. Unfortunately, it has gotten much worse, especially ever since an orange someone was elected President. The violent consequences of prejudice is mostly directed to the wrong groups, and director Euzhan Palcy's 1989 film, A Dry White Season, shows how that hate is definitely universal, meaning that it doesn't just happen in the movies. Based

Criterion Announces March 2019 Releases

Start saving now.
  |   Comments
It's movie madness next March from Criterion with the release of six titles. They are Ted Wilde's The Kid Brother, Edgar G. Ulmer's Detour, Barbara Loden's Wanda, Robert Zemeckis's I Wanna Hold Your Hand, and Carlos Reygadas's Japón. Ingmar Bergman’s The Magic Flute is getting a Blu-ray upgrade. Read on to learn more about them. The Magic Flute (#71) out Mar 12 This scintillating screen version of Mozart’s beloved opera showcases Ingmar Bergman’s deep knowledge of music and gift for expressing it cinematically. Casting some of Europe’s finest soloists—Josef Köstlinger, Ulrik Cold, Håkan Hagegård, and Birgit Nordin among them—the director

A Story from Chikamatsu Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: A Tale Worth Watching

Criterion continues their welcome attention to the works of director Kenji Mizoguchi with this superb new Blu-ray release.
  |   Comments
When an adulterous nobleman learns that his wife is rumored to be carrying on an affair with a member of his staff, he seeks to punish both of them. Sure, it’s fine for the man to brazenly step out on his wife, but when the smallest hint of initially untrue impropriety is leveled against her, his righteous indignation speaks volumes about the vast gender morality imbalance. There’s also the matter of his continued noble status, as his failure to punish his perceived transgressors carries the risk of loss of his esteemed title. With that setup in place, director Kenji Mizoguchi

Criterion Announces February 2019 Releases

Criterion sets the bar high this month.
  |   Comments
The groundhog says Criterion will add four new titles to the collection. They are Ingmar Bergman’s Shame, Henri-Georges Clouzot’s La vérité, Luchino Visconti's Death in Venice, and Charles Burnett's To Sleep with Anger. Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s fifteen-hour Berlin Alexanderplatz is getting a Blu-ray upgrade. Read on to learn more about them. Shame (#961) out Feb 5 Ingmar Bergman’s Shame is at once an examination of the violent legacy of World War II and a scathing response to the escalation of the conflict in Vietnam. Max von Sydow and Liv Ullmann star as musicians living in quiet retreat on a remote

Shampoo Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: Head and Shoulders Above the Rest

Warren Beatty and Goldie Hawn relive the swinging '60s in the mid-'70s.
  |   Comments
Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of this film is Warren Beatty’s glorious hair. Playing a Beverly Hills hairdresser/lothario named George, Beatty wields long locks styled to such excess that they’re seemingly a special effect. Thankfully, the rest of the film is worthy of the majestic mane, delivering a sharply humorous exploration of sexual politics against a backdrop of real politics set during the timeframe of Nixon’s 1968 election. George is a talented hairdresser who dreams of opening his own shop, but lacks the means to make it happen. He has a girlfriend named Jill (Goldie Hawn), but also engages in

Criterion's Release of The Princess Bride is the Pick of the Week

It's a week full of great interesting releases, so let's have fun storming the castle of upcoming Blu-ray releases.
  |   Comments
Hello. My name is Mat Brewster. I’ve picked The Princess Bride this week. Prepare to enjoy. It is a C.C.O.U.A (Criterion Collection of Usual Awesomeness) with a brand new 4K scan and loads of new and old extras. Including audio commentaries, an in-depth making-of documentary, interviews, features on the making of the film, and more. Let me explain the plot. No, there is too much. Let me sum up. The Princess Bride is Rob Reiner’s adaptation of William Goldman’s beloved novel that lovingly satirizes princess stories while remaining a wonderful comedic adventure with plenty of romance and enough great lines

Criterion Announces January 2019 Releases

Which of these will you add to your video library in 2019?
  |   Comments
Criterion rings in the new year with few titles that would look good in your collection. They are Abbas Kiarostami 24 Frames, Elaine May's Mikey and Nicky, Cristian Mungiu's 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, and Norman Jewison's In the Heat of the Night. Alfred Hitchcock's Notorious is getting a Blu-ray upgrade. Read on to learn more about them. 24 Frames (#956) out Jan 8 For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging

A Raisin in the Sun Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: A Wonderfully Acted Film

A masterpiece adaptation of Lorraine Hansberry's eternal play about the conflicts of Black life.
  |   Comments
While some movies about the African-American experience are embarassing and downright stereotypical, there are others that realistically transcend the bad taste, to tell truthful stories of the issues and obstacles that face people of color. Director Daniel Petrie's brilliant 1961 adaptation of celebrated author/playwright Lorraine Hansberry's eternal play, A Raisin in the Sun, is definitely one of the seminal films of all-time. It takes place mostly in a cramped Chicago apartment that houses the Younger family: Lena (Claudia McNeil), the strong and proud matriach; her son Walter Lee (Sidney Poitier), an ambitious but often reckless man; his wife Ruth (Ruby

My Man Godfrey Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review: My Man Powell Strikes Gold

Screwball comedy masks an insightful examination of the class divide in the wake of the Great Depression
  |   Comments
At a glance, My Man Godfrey appears to be a typical formulaic production from Hollywood’s golden age. Headlined by two huge stars and fellow Oscar nominees for this film, William Powell and Carole Lombard, the film focuses on an upper-crust family in New York City, with all their trappings of success and opulent parties on full display. However, this is far from a standard wealthy family, and that’s where the film proves its originality. Based on his novel and featuring a screenplay co-written by Eric Hatch, the film is a comedic social critique examining the class divide between the homeless

Criterion Announces December 2018 Releases

Three new titles are added to the collection as 2018 concludes.
  |   Comments
In December, Criterion is releasing a few titles you might want someone to get you during the holiday season. They are Euzhan Palcy's A Dry White Season, Samuel Fuller's Forty Guns, and Julien Duvivier's Panique, and Ingmar Bergman's Sawdust and Tinsel is getting a stand-alone Blu-ray edition. Read on to learn more about them. A Dry White Season (#953) out Dec 11 With this bracing drama, made at the climax of the anti-apartheid movement, director Euzhan Palcy issued a devastating indictment of South Africa’s racist government—and made history in the process, becoming the first black woman to direct a Hollywood

Ocean's 8 is the Pick of the Week

Here's what's interesting in the new Blu-ray releases this week.
  |   Comments
With reboots, re-imaginings, remakes, sequels, prequels, etc. and so forth, it's hard to keep up with all the ways Hollywood takes an existing property and changes it just enough to get us back into theaters (or at least attempt to do that). I get why they do it. You’ve got an established property with a built in fan base, but it's a few years (or decades) past its expiration date so you bring in fresh faces and start over. But it's hard not to be cynical about these things. Ocean’s 8 is an interesting twist in this ever-expanding and changing
2 3 4 5 6 7 8  

Follow Us