January 2020 Archives

Parasite Blu-ray Review: Remarkable and Timely

A modern masterpiece of wicked social commentary and unexpected pathos.
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Director Bong Joon-ho has crafted a very impressive body of work. Whether it's urban squalor (Snowpiercer), monster chaos (The Host), friendship between youth and beast (Okja), and a mother taking the law into her own hands (Mother), he has shown the film world that he can put his own distinctive, stylish spin on the often colorful, albeit dark side of humanity. And with arguably his finest achievement, the ferociously entertaining Parasite (2019), he has amazingly tapped into greed and social dysfunction with an air of urgency and unpredictable emotion. The film centers on two vastly different social classes: the super

José Movie Review: Realism Dominates Craft

This Guatemalan drama is a delicate observation of an episode in the life of its titular character.
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Conflict defines the structure of a story. Mightier the conflict, the intriguing the story gets. But what if a story lacks conflict, or persuades you into accepting something invisible as its core conflict? José answers it, or may I say, lets you figure it out. Incompleteness resonates with José, the titular character, the people around him, and even the film itself. A character even says that he paid half the amount to purchase a house. The film tries to replicate José's life, considering his life isn't complete yet, incompleteness doesn't come with a negative connotation but befittingly describes one of

Sundance Film Festival 2020 Review: 'Herself' and 'Miss Juneteenth' are Actress Vehicles About Hopefulness

Two successful star vehicles about working-class mothers looking to find a new lease on life.
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When one hits a speed bump in life, it’s never too late to try and start over. Two films that premiered at Sundance not only exemplify that message, but do so by depicting working-class mothers who feel like they may have hit the end of the line. In addition, both Herself and Miss Juneteenth manage to walk a pretty successful line between hopefulness and pragmatism. Herself follows the story of Sandra Kelly (Clare Dunne), a Dublin mother who flees from her abusive husband and lives with her children inside a hotel room. Looking to build a better life for herself

Harriet (2019) Blu-ray Review: A Long Walk to Freedom

Though mildly hampered by biopic cliches, the film succeeds with a strong performance by Cynthia Ervio.
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One of the most surprising things about Harriet is the fact that, prior to it, there hadn’t been a single feature film made about Harriet Tubman, the American abolitionist breaking free from slavery and leading numerous missions to free others. Her life story had been the subject of many television miniseries/single episodes, but Hollywood had never made a movie about it. And what we are given is your average biopic that was mostly made to garner some attention from Oscar voters. That’s not to say that Harriet is a particularly bad movie; it’s actually a good one. But it has

2020 Oscar-nominated Documentary Short Films Review

How does our humanity express itself in the face of trauma? War? Tragedy? These are the questions that are explored in this year’s Academy Award nominees in the Documentary Short Film category.
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On January 29, ShortsTV will debut THE 2020 OSCAR NOMINATED SHORT FILMS at the IFC Center in New York City and in select markets, and then roll out across the US and Europe on January 31. This marks the 15th consecutive year of the Oscar Nominated Short Films theatrical experience. It is the only opportunity for audiences to watch the short film nominees in theaters before the Academy Awards ceremony on Sunday February 9, 2020. They will also made available via on demand platforms, including iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, Google Play and Vimeo on Demand. The release ensures the greatest

TV Review: Twin - A Limited Series

In his new series, Game of Thrones' Kristofer Hivju gets to play not just one larger-than-life character, but twin brothers who couldn't be more dissimilar - or more at odds with one another.
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Norwegian actor Kristofer Hivju is probably best-known to most avid television viewers as the ginger-haired, love-lorn Tormund Giantsbane from HBO's Game of Thrones. Hivju made an indelible impression as the Wildling with a huge personality who would defend his BFF Jon Snow to the death against dragons, Lannisters, and whatever else stood in their way. In his new series Twin, Hivju gets to play not just one larger-than-life character, but twin brothers who couldn't be more dissimilar - or more at odds with one another. Adam and Erik (Hivju) haven't spoken to one another for fifteen years. Erik has been

All About My Mother is the Pick of the Week

A gorgeous 1999 Almodovar classic tops a new week of stellar releases.
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Director Pedro Almodovar is one of the finest filmmakers in the history of film. He is truly the greatest master of the modern melodrama, works of colorful art that features strong women, explicit themes of sexuality, and symbolic approaches to story/plot. In one of his sublime masterworks, All About My Mother (1999), he arguably reached his zenith, by tributing his love and respect for females, their friendships, and the issues that connect them forever. Cecilia Roth stars as Manuela, a nurse whose life is emotionally shaken and devastated after her son gets killed in a hit-and-run accident. She moves to

Sundance Film Festival 2020 Review: 'Falling' Definitely Falls Flat

Viggo Mortensen's directorial debut lands with a thud.
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Viggo Mortensen’s directorial debut Falling attempts to dive into the uncomfortable topic of families divided over politics, yet succumbs to its need to beat the audience in the head over how incredibly awkward discussing political beliefs can be. It’s a picture that has its heart in the right place and aims to be a thoughtful family drama but it feels like one is watching a “movie family” rather than a real family. When Willis (Lance Henriksen) stays with his gay son John (Viggo Mortensen) and his partner Eric (Terry Chen), the film follows the immense friction between them which includes

2020 Oscar-nominated Animated Short Films Review

The five nominees are...
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On January 29, ShortsTV will debut THE 2020 OSCAR NOMINATED SHORT FILMS at the IFC Center in New York City and in select markets, and then roll out across the US and Europe on January 31. This marks the 15th consecutive year of the Oscar Nominated Short Films theatrical experience. It is the only opportunity for audiences to watch the short film nominees in theaters before the Academy Awards ceremony on Sunday February 9, 2020. They will also made available via on demand platforms, including iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, Google Play and Vimeo on Demand. The release ensures the greatest

'A Sister' Live Action Short Review: Utilizes Minimalism to the Fullest

A brilliant exercise of inducing anxiety.
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A Sister is a film that relies heavily on the atmosphere. It's a dark film, literally. A moving car on a freeway at midnight is the vehicle for the film. The story begins and ends in approximately 17 minutes. There's isn't anything like a narrative or story here. A woman in possible danger calls emergency services where the employee, another woman, has to help her. What sets the stakes high is that the caller is not in a situation that could have catastrophic results, but the call she makes could be her only chance in preventing the disastrous consequences, which

Five Cool Things and the Year of the Rat

Happy Chinese New Year, everybody.
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I watched a lot less Jean-Pierre Melville films this week than I did last week. In fact, I only watched one, but it was a really good one. I'll probably try to catch another couple this coming week to finish out my month of Melville and then I'll have to decide what February's theme will be. But what I missed in Melville this week I made up for in lots of other random things. I tell ya, I must have been eating my Wheaties or something this month. I regularly struggle finding five cool things to talk about each week.

TV Review: The Forgotten Army: Predictability Plays the Spoilsport

A barely effective war drama that never finds it foot.
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The Forgotten Army has its creator's signature all over it. And that doesn't quite work in its favor. Kabir Khan brings on his documentary heritage to all of his feature films. Beginning with his debut, Kabul Express, followed by New York, Ek Tha Tiger, Bhajrangi Bhaijaan, Phantom, and his last release Tube light, all the films have war, and travel in common. Characters travelling in pursuit of something has been a key narrative tool. And The Forgotten Army is no different, and that's where things go haywire. The Forgotten Army just feels like yet another Bollywood movie minus the dance

The Addams Family (2019) Blu-ray Review: Not Creepy or Kooky

Animated take on the famous family is so bland it practically vanishes from sight.
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The Addams Family is the very definition of Hollywood product, a project so completely lacking any creative spark or reason for existence that it feels like everyone involved had to be convinced to participate. The character designs are so over-exaggerated and super-deformed one can almost sense the pixels threatening to revolt in protest, while the story is so obvious it could have written itself. And yet, in spite of its many shortcomings, it isn’t an altogether unpleasant family film, especially because it largely sidesteps the rude humor one typically expects from lower-tier animated fare. For this iteration of the famous

'The Neighbor's Window' Live Action Short Review: Leaves a Lasting Impact

A little film with a huge heart.
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I love it when films tell a thing or two about life, smoothly sharing a message into our subconscious. Especially anything that makes me feel good and appreciates little things in life which we, in general, take for granted. Marshalll Curry's The Neighbor's Window is one such bitter-sweet story that's coated with multiple themes like urban loneliness, individuality, marital life, and the way we perceive other's lives. The emphasis is on the last point. Here, the leads, Alli (Maria Dizzia, terrific) and Jacob (Greg Keller, equally good), a couple on the beginning of mid-life crisis, literally peek into the window

The Forgotten Army Debuts January 24, 2020 on Amazon Prime Video Worldwide

With the love story between two soldiers - Sodhi & Maya at the heart of it, the series raises several questions about identity, independence and the idea of motherland and the cost of freedom.
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The Forgotten Army chronicles the dynamic story of Lieutenant Sodhi and his army of heroic men and women fighting for Indian Independence during World War II as part of the Indian National Army led by the charismatic Indian leader Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose. The Forgotten Army is the first story which will be depict the journey and sacrifice of the Indian National Army from the point of view of its soldiers, and brings to life the story of Lt. Sodhi’s daring group of men and women fighting for the liberation of their country from the grips of British colonial ruling

Zombi Child Movie Review: A Slow Exploration of Voodoo and Adolescence

A meditative zombie flick that revitalizes the genre while simultaneously exploring its origins.
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With Zombi Child, director Bertrand Bonello pulls off both a reinvigoration of the zombie genre and a reclaiming of its origins. Over the years, people have associated zombies with their hunger for human flesh and loss of morality and consciousness once they become zombified. But Bonello aims to make a meditative horror drama about colonialism and adolescence. Zombi Child follows two different storylines. One set in Haiti 1962 involving Clairvius Narcisse (Mackenson Bijou), the most famous victim of the practice called zombieism who was drugged and sold into slavery while in a susceptible mind set. The other storyline is set

'Brotherhood' Live Action Short Review: Family & the Cruel World

The sorrowful story takes center stage despite the masterful cinematic craft at display.
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Brotherhood could have been a minimalistic tale of a family confronting a circumstance, which although it appears to bring joy, has a severe flip side to it, both repercussions in contrariety to each other. When the eldest son of the family, Malek returns home after spending a year in Syria, should the family exult the recrudesce of their son, or bemoan the veracity and cower from the possible consequences? Without restricting to this question, which evidently facade the narrative, the film goes deeper and beyond. It's the father's internal turmoil as he thwarts being rived between his family and his

Brewster's Millions Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review: Maybe Worth a Hundred

A movie I loved as a kid as depreciated a great deal over the years.
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In 1902, George Barr McCutcheon, writing under the pseudonym of Richard Graves, wrote a novel entitled Brewster’s Millions. In it, a young man named Montgomery Brewster learns of a large inheritance of $7 million due to him after his uncle died. The stipulations of the will are strange - he can only earn the $7 million is he spends $1 million within one year's time and manages to not own any assets at the end of it. The novel was turned into a Broadway play in 1906, a radio play in 1937, and has been adapted into no less than

Sliding Doors Collector's Edition Blu-ray Review: Let Them Close

A unique concept that stretches itself way too thin.
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The idea behind Sliding Doors is one that is rather original and intriguing. Imagine someone living two separate but shared storylines. One focuses on what happens if she were to miss the train she’s supposed to catch to go back home. The other focuses on what happens if she got on the train in time. They have the same people, but differ in terms of certain character actions and landmark events. It’s something that might have worked in The Twilight Zone. As a feature film, and one that relies on so many rom-com cliches, not so much. Gwyneth Paltrow plays

Jexi Blu-ray Review: Mindless, Silly Fun with a Hint of Possibility

Overall, the movie is enjoyable.
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Phil (Adam Devine) has led a lone and solitary life. He has no real friends, spends the majority of his time at home, and is completely obsessed with his cellphone. So much so, that his two co-workers, Craig (Ron Funches) and Elaine (Charlyne Yi), who have sat next to him at work for the last three years don’t even know one another’s names. Even though Phil aspires to be a real journalist, his social anxiety keeps him from reaching that goal and instead, his job consists of him writing top-ten lists that usually includes cute animals with the sole purpose

Fathom Events and TCM Present An American in Paris

Watching "An American in Paris" on the big screen was an exceptional experience and one I fully recommend.
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In the late 1940s, MGM executive Arthur Freed attended a production of George Gershwin classics and became inspired by the orchestral composition An American in Paris. Not so much because of the music, which he felt was great, but by the title. He felt you could really make a movie out of something like that. He hired Alan Jay Lerner to come up with a story. Gene Kelley was quickly hired to star and choreograph the many dance sequences. Gershwin's friend and grand pianist Oscar Levant was hired as Gene Kelly's friend and newcomer Leslie Caron was eventually signed to

The House by the Cemetery is the Pick of the Week

Lucio Fulci's gore-iffic 1981 haunted house chiller tops a new week of releases.
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The late Lucio Fulci will be forever known as the Italian "master of gore." His films have become influential templates of how gruesome blood and guts have been depicted in the horror genre, even if none of the plots are particularly original or inventive. His 1981 haunted house creeper, The House by the Cemetery, tends to get overshadowed by his more popular works, such as Zombie, City of the Living Fead, and The Beyond. However, Cemetery may arguably be his most accessible flick, because there is a sort-of sense of structure taking place that is actually missing from those iconic

Color Out of Space (2020) Movie Review: A Campy and Gorgeous Lovecraft Adaptation

Not on the same level of nuttiness as Mandy, but a thrilling, B-grade invasion film overall.
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One of the great things about Nicolas Cage’s decisions to appear in practically anything that crosses his desk is, every now and then, we’ll get a movie that is just as wild and as over-the-top as his performance. In 2018, the Oscar-winning actor partnered with Panos Cosmatos for the phantasmagoric Mandy, which equally balanced its bonkers and campy approach with Cage’s typical moments of shouting and wide-eyed gazes. Most of the time, Cage does his own thing while the script and direction do something entirely different. In most cases, the result is something conventional with some meme-able moments provided by

Corpus Christi (2019) Movie Review: A Drama of Mistaken Identities

The journey of a juvenile in reformatory who becomes a reformer himself.
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Nominated for the Academy Awards' Best International Feature Film, this Polish drama opens with an "Inspired by real-life events" tag, instantly drawing us towards it. Daniel (Bartosz Bielenia) is in a detention center for a second-degree crime. We are introduced to the horrors of the place moments after his fellow detainees strip and beat a weakling, and Daniel helps these men. In a contrasting follow-up scene, he is seen arranging chairs for the prayer sermon followed by singing the hymns of the Lord like a good Christian. We get to know that he will soon get out on parole. He

TV Review: Arrow / Legends of Tomorrow: 'Crisis on Infinite Earths, Part 4 & 5'

The crossover ends with at least some permanent changes to the CW Universe.
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A pair of Sentries are teaming up to take on the five-part "Crisis on Infinite Earths" crossover event. If you would like to start with previous episodes, please read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. Arrow Gordon S. Miller As the miniseries continues, The Paragons, seven heroes (well, six since Lex Luthor replaced Superman), remain trapped outside time and space. Viewers learn that 10,000 years ago on the planet Maltus, the Monitor attempted to travel back to the Dawn of Time, but the experiment caused a breach between universes, unleashing the Anti-monitor. Oliver, now in his role as the

Five Cool Things and Neil Peart

This week I dig deep into French director Jean-Pierre Melville's films and we mourn the loss of a great drummer.
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For the last two years, I have spent the months of October and November viewing movies through a theme. In October, I’ve naturally watched as many horror movies as I could, and in November, I’ve been a part of #Noirvember (November + Film Noir). Like most people, I suppose I typically watched movies randomly. I turn on various streaming services, or look through my DVD collection and watch whatever looks interesting at that moment. It has been really fun to watch movies through a theme. At the end of both of these months, I’ve thought of ways of extending this

'Nefta Football Club' Live Action Short Review: A Light Film with a Heavy Moral

A sweet tale of ignorance where the wisdom lies beneath the silliness.
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Nefta Football Club is a great case study to convey a message through the film instead of jostling it on the face. Rajinikanth, an Indian movie star with a legacy as famous as Chuck Norris, is known for mouthing dialogues about life and success. One such dialogue is "You can't achieve success without hard work, and the success that comes your way without hard work won't stay long." This quote sums up the moral of the 18-minute Nefta Football Club. Filmmaker Yves Piat treats a thin thread with the utmost respect and gives a piece of cinema that has profound

Water and Sugar: Carlo Di Palma - The Colours of Life DVD Review

An affectionate, if not entirely in-depth document on a truly influential cinematographer.
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Next to the director, the cinematographer is one of the most essential components to making great art. Cinematography can capture emotion and depth with vision, almost always better than words can ever do. Many of film history's greatest masters of light, including Roger Deakins, Karl Struss, Gordon Willis, Gregg Toland, Sven Nykvist, and Haskell Wexler, among others, have successfully demonstrated how images can truly increase the impact of any film, even if certain movies themselves, are not particulary meaningful. However, if there was one who somehow continues to be forgotten in the annals of the history of the medium, it

Criterion Announces April 2020 Releases

Criterion rides again with five titles.
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In April, Criterion adds four titles to the collection. They are George Marshall's Destry Rides Again, Juraj Herz's The Cremator, Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel, and Miranda July's Me and You and Everyone We Know. Also available will be a Blu-ray upgrade of Jean-Pierre Melville's Army of Shadows. Read on to learn more about them. Army of Shadows (#385) out Apr 7 The most personal film by the underworld poet Jean-Pierre Melville, who had participated in the French Resistance himself, this tragic masterpiece, based on a novel by Joseph Kessel, recounts the struggles and sacrifices of those who fought

'Saria' Live Action Short Review: Agonizing and Heartbreaking

A potent work that emphatically proves the effectiveness of short-form cinema.
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Bryan Buckley's Saria is based on 2017's tragedy when 41 girls orphan girls lost their lives to fire in Virgen de La Asuncion Safe Home in Guatemala, the very same orphanage they were housed in, or I may say, jailed. The first and last shots of the film have a spider crawling in the hallway of the orphanage, and the spider appears at three different junctures. First, the spider crawls into a closed room. Second, Saria, the titular character, saves the insect trapped in soap foam and lets it go out of the orphanage. Third, the spider crawls out of

ShortsTV to Release the Oscar-Nominated Shorts 2020 in Theaters January 31st

This is the only opportunity for audiences to watch the short film nominees in theaters before the Academy Awards ceremony on Sunday February 9, 2020.
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Press release: ShortsTV, the leading platform dedicated to short entertainment (www.shorts.tv), today announced the titles it will feature in the 15th annual theatrical release of the Oscar Nominated Short Films, a three-compilation showcase. The 2020 Oscar Nominated Short Films feature Academy Nominated Short Films from the Live Action, Animation and Documentary categories. ShortsTV will debut the astounding compendium of some of the year’s best but unseen films that will clock in at more than five hours of film. ShortsTV will premiere the 2020 Oscar-Nominated Short Films at the IFC Center in New York City and in select markets on January

Film Critic and Historian Leonard Maltin to Receive 3rd Annual Robert Osborne Award

Award to be presented during the 11th annual TCM Classic Film Festival for his significant contribution to film history & preservation.
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Press release: Turner Classic Movies (TCM) today announced that the third annual Robert Osborne Award, recognizing an individual who has helped keep the cultural heritage of classic film alive for future generations, will be presented to one of the world's most respected film critics and historians, Leonard Maltin. He will receive the award at the 2020 TCM Classic Film Festival during a screening of a nitrate print, provided by the UCLA Film and Television Archive, of one of his favorite films, Counsellor at Law (1933). The first two Robert Osborne Awards were given out in 2018 to iconic filmmaker Martin

All the Freckles in the World Movie Review: Suffused with Simplicity, Innocence, and Lively Moments

Yibrán Asuad's film is suffused with simplicity and innocence.
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Is it necessary that a film set in the '90s resemble a movie from the '90s? All the Freckles in the World had me asking that question over and over, scene by scene. And my answer to it, it's not an issue if done well and even better if it mirrors the time. It wouldn't take thought to strike the film off by disregarding the simplicity of proceedings to the shallowness, the light-hearted nature to the absolute lack of stakes, and self-absorption to the absence of motivation in writing. The moments aren't underlined; no musical score guides you on how

The Fugitive Kind is the Pick of the Week

Sidney Lumet's 1960 adaptation of a Tennessee Williams play heads a new week of releases.
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Legendary director Sidney Lumet (1924-2011) had a knack for creating cinematic creations from some of history's greatest plays, novels, and true stories. Whether it was his iconic examination of Reginald Rose's timeless 12 Angry Men; Al Pacino's Sonny's bizarre bank robbery in Dog Day Afternoon; or a harrowing study of domestic and familial breakdown that surfaces Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night, Lumet brought his own stylistic flourishes that continue to be beloved to this today. However, and this is painful for me to do this, but if I had to choose his most divided work, it has to

[Updated] 2020 Academy Award Winners Announced

Joker leads with 11 nominations followed by The Irishman, 1917, and Once upon a Time...in Hollywood with 10 each.
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Press release: The 92nd Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 9, 2020, at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, and will be televised live on ABC at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT. “ Oscars: Live on the Red Carpet” will air at 6:30 p.m. ET/3:30 p.m. PT. The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide. Joker leads with 11 nominations followed by The Irishman, 1917, and Once upon a Time...in Hollywood with 10 each. Academy members from each of the 17 branches vote to determine the nominees in

Sinister Six Card Game Review: Supervillains Unite (or Not)!

"Every villain is a hero of his or her own story." - Christopher Vogler, "The Writer’s Journey"
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From Spin Master, comes Sinister Six, a card game named after the infamous group of super villains from Spider-Man's rogues' gallery that first united together against Peter Parker in The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1 (Jan. 1964). At their inception, the sextet included Doctor Octopus, Electro, Kraven, Mysterio, Sandman, and Vulture. In addition, players (three to six) are also able to choose from Lizard, Rhino, Venom, and Green Goblin. Designed by Daryl Andrews & Adrian Adamescu, the object of the game is for players to work together on four heists and then defeat Spider-Man while working individually to gain the most

1917 Movie Review: A Visually Bold Look at the Heart of War

1917 is a terrific war epic with masterful technical aesthetics.
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After reinvigorating the Bond franchise with Skyfall and ending his run on a whimper with Spectre, director Sam Mendes makes a leap into the war genre with 1917, a technically bold look at an often undiscussed period within history. Although it hardly goes beyond being technically bold, it still is quite admirable in its ambition. The whole film is structured as if it’s a continuous take and takes place over a couple days. Two soldiers, Will Schofield (George MacKay) and Tom Blake (Dean Charles-Chapman), are assigned to deliver a message to the second battalion of the Devonshire Regiment to prevent

Five Cool Things and Another New Cat

Another week filled with cool new things.
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Last month, I finally broke down and subscribed to Disney+. With The Rise of Skywalker coming out, I knew we’d want to watch some of the films, and with my daughter off for Christmas break, I knew we’d enjoy watching some Pixar or Marvel movies. We’d also be spending a week at my in-laws with all my wife’s family so I figured I could bring my Amazon Fire box and we’d all enjoy Disney+ more than regular cable TV. All of this was true, but mostly I wanted to watch The Mandalorian, Disney+’s new Star Wars series. We had a

PSIFF 2020 Review: Adventures of a Mathematician

The story piqued my interest about the scientists involved, making me want to learn more about them and their projects.
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Based on the autobiography of the same name, writer/director Thor Klein's Adventures of a Mathematiciantells the story of Stanislaw Ulam's time working for the United States government on the Manhattan Project, which produced the first nuclear weapons. Covering about a decade in his life during the 1940s, we meet an intelligent man who deals with matters at a distance, both personal and professional. In 1941, Stanislaw (Philippe Tlokinski), or “Stan” by those close to him, is a Polish mathematician teaching in the United States at Harvard. His younger brother Adam (Mateusz Wieclawek). They are both concerned about their family back

The Lighthouse Blu-ray Review: A Shining Beacon of Excellence

A two-hander where your two hands will be firmly embedded in your armrests.
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I wasn’t at all familiar with director and co-writer Robert Eggers until this masterful sophomore effort, but immediately added his debut, The Witch, to my must-see queue after falling under the spell of The Lighthouse. The film really shouldn’t work, and yet it’s about as close to perfection as I encountered in last year’s film slate. It’s a dialogue-rich two-hander that is so stage-ready it’s just missing spotlights, it’s a twisted cerebral thriller with some insane freak-out moments, and it’s filmed on actual film in black and white in a nearly-square 1.19:1 aspect ratio that legitimately makes it seem like

Like A Boss Movie Review: A Middling Investment

Rose Byrne and Tiffany Haddish are the strong center of this amusing yet manufactured comedy.
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The new comedy Like A Boss is like a cone of vanilla ice cream with sprinkles. It does its job at being satisfactory the way one would expect but with some added touches. It’s firmly aware that it isn’t meant to change the face of comedy even if it doesn’t offer “laugh a minute”-type humor. Yet, it admirably adds some slight heft with its handling of lifelong friendships. Mia Carter (Tiffany Haddish) and Mel Paige (Rose Byrne) have been together through thick and thin. Despite them having different personalities, they still have remained close friends who live together and run

The Sonata Movie Review: Safe, Self-aware, and Focussed

It marries the physical and mental facets of horror.
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A little question strikes me every time I watch a horror movie. Do horror movies exist in the universe of other horror movies? Isn't it quite apparent that an old mansion in the woods is a set up for the upcoming horror? The person entering it should be aware of it or at the least, shed little doubt, provided he/she has seen at least one horror movie in their life. Andrew Desmond's The Sonata has a quite interesting treatment. The evident intent of horror films would be to scare the living shit out of the audience. Some choose jump scares,

Pan African Film Festival | Opening Night Film, 'Hero,' Helmed by Female Director Frances-Anne Solomon | Tuesday, February 11, 2020

The festival will be held from February 11 - 23, 2020 at the Cinemark 15 Theatres, located at the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza in Los Angeles.
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Press release: The 28th annual Pan African Film and Arts Festival (PAFF) will open with the film “HERO: Inspired by the Extraordinary Revolutionary Life and Times of Diplomat and Judge Ulric Cross,” directed by Caribbean filmmaker Frances-Anne Solomon. The festival will kick off festivities with a star-studded Opening Night Gala at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 11, 2020 at the Directors Guild of America (DGA), located at 7920 W. Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood. This year’s theme is “20/20 Vision,” kicking off the decade with a fresh lens and solidifying its commitment to tell diverse stories with a global, luminous view.

Joker Blu-ray Review: A Gritty Origin Story for Batman's Most Iconic Villain

Joaquin Phoenix delivers a strong performance as the Clown Prince of Crime.
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Numerous actors have depicted Batman’s most famous villain, the Joker, over the years, all with different takes on the evil clown. Joaquin Phoenix is the latest in a long line of actors that includes Cesar Romero, Jack Nicholson, Mark Hamill, and Heath Ledger. Phoenix’s Joker is an emaciated, mentally ill, very psychotic, yet somewhat sympathetic character. His performance highlights the strong, yet controversial Joker. Directed by Todd Phillips, Joker, the highest-grossing Rated-R movie of all time, is set in early '80s Gotham City, where a garbage strike has led to an infestation of super rats. Gotham’s prognosis is bleak and

Holiday (1938) is the Pick of the Week

An almost forgotten 1938 George Cukor classic starts off 2020's first new week of releases.
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Talking about the films that Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn made together, you usually go to 1938's Bringing Up Baby, and definitely 1940's The Philadelphia Story. However, George Cukor's somewhat overshadowed romance, Holiday (also 1938), shouldn't be left in the dust, especially because it is actually more grounded and honest than both Baby and Philadelphia Story. There is a type of subversive social commentary that you didn't really expect in the '30s. Adapted from Philip Barry's 1928 play, the film stars Grant as Johnny Case, a free-spirted man from humble beginnings who is engaged to Julia (Doris Nolan), a beautiful

PSIFF 2020 Review: Antigone (2019)

An ancient Greek tragedy re-imagined in the living conditions and troubles faced by an immigrant family in Montreal.
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Antigone directed by Sophie Deraspe is Canada’s official entry to Best International Feature Film at the 92nd Academy Awards. The film is an adaptation of a Greek tragedy of the same name written by Sophocles in 441BCE. The play is about the Thebes civil war, which leads to the death of Antigone’s brother Polynices, and how she will fight the ruler and the state for the proper burial of her brother. It plays around the complex themes like civil disobedience, natural law vs. law of the state. The film doesn’t adapt the exact plot of the play but its focus

Chuck Berry Hail! Hail! Rock 'n' Roll Blu-ray Review: It's Good to Be the King

Hail! Hail! tells an important, albeit incomplete, story of an American music legend.
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Chuck Berry Hail! Hail! Rock 'N' Roll pays tribute to the man many consider the King of Rock 'n' Roll, through testimonials from peers and famous fans, from a drunken Jerry Lee Lewis, who makes the claim for he and his mama, to John Lennon appearing through archival footage on The Michael Douglas Show. The film also documents the 60th birthday celebration concert held in his honor, which takes up the last half of the film. Unfortunately, it doesn't paint a complete picture of Berry's life as he cuts interviews short when touchy subjects are broached. In 1986, Berry was

Five Cool Things and Hunters

A new year brings many new cool things.
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I hope everyone had a great holiday season. I had a great time with mine and my wife’s family. I received some wonderful gifts (including that spectacular Godzilla set from Criterion and some Grateful Dead socks). I also got some much-needed rest. With a couple of weeks off, I have lots of cool things to talk about. It was really hard to just pick five, but never fear, I’m sure I’ll slip some of the things I consumed over my break during the next few weeks. Universal Horror Collection, Vol. 3 This collection from Shout Factory continues to cover Universal

PSIFF 2020 Review: 'Free Color' Replicates Its Master's Art Form

Alberto Arevalo's documentary follows Carlos Cruz-Diez, Venezuelan-born artist, who at 94, sets out to achieve something unseen and unheard of in the artist community.
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I've always wondered how individuals feel after reaching a peak of success in their respective fields, I mean, don't the tremendous achievements create a sense of satisfaction leading to fulfilment? If not, then I have to change the way I look at success and its fruits. It takes some time to get familiar with the vibe it creates, but after its opening moments, Free Color profoundly replicates the art form, which the film's subject and artist, Carlos Cruz-Diez, dreams to create. Now, we have only seen color being a part of an art form. In painting, color decorates, creates a

Best of 2019 Assorted Lists

I appreciate your patience with me through the year with my silly little projects.
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From 2005 through 2012, I pretty consistently wrote my Sunday Morning Tuneage blog. It continued inconsistently through 2013 before being abandoned. Each year was punctuated with a series of best-of lists. While the blog still remains retired, I'm revived it last year for a Best of 2017 and 2018. The feedback was enough for me to compile it again this year. BEST OF THE REST 2019 BY THE NUMBERS 5,004,620 steps taken this year (2,425 miles) 365 days walking over five miles in 2019 Three days not walking over five miles since 1/1/15. 28 days with over seven hours of

Best of 2019 TV / Streaming Lists

The best of shows that came across my TV screen and the little movies called advertisements.
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From 2005 through 2012, I pretty consistently wrote my Sunday Morning Tuneage blog. It continued inconsistently through 2013 before being abandoned. Each year was punctuated with a series of best-of lists. While the blog still remains retired, I'm revived it last year for a Best of 2017 and 2018. The feedback was enough for me to compile it again this year. BEST OF TV / STREAMING 2019 We live in a very high quality TV-show era now. Maybe the top end isn't as strong as a decade ago but the number of very good shows is amazing. It's hard to

Blue Collar Blu-ray Review: Workingman's Blues

Paul Schrader's directorial debut gets a nice new release from Kino Lorber.
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After finding great success as a screenwriter on such movies as The Yakuza (directed by Sydney Pollack), Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese) and Obsession (Brian De Palma), Paul Schrader had the clout to demand the ability to direct his own scripts. His first film as director was Blue Collar, a down and dirty drama about three guys working on an assembly line at an auto plant who decide to rob their own union and find themselves over their heads. It is a realistic portrayal of the lower middle class and how big business and big unions can grind a person down

Best of 2019 Film Lists

The best of movie lists of 2019 for movies I saw and ones I should have seen. And a stab at 2020.
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From 2005 through 2012, I pretty consistently wrote my Sunday Morning Tuneage blog. It continued inconsistently through 2013 before being abandoned. Each year was punctuated with a series of best-of lists. While the blog still remains retired, I'm revived it last year for a Best of 2017 and 2018. The feedback was enough for me to compile it again this year. BEST OF FILM 2019 No other blogger is brave enough to pick their favorites before they see them. Here's what I boldly thought I'd be writing about in December 2019. PREDICTED BEST MOVIES OF 2019 (Dec. 2018) 1. AVENGERS:

The Magic Sword Blu-ray Review: Dragons, Princesses, and Basil Rathbone

A film so bad the guys at Mystery Science Theater 3000 called it "pretty good."
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Poor Basil Rathbone. After finding great success on stage and the screen, after becoming a huge star playing Robin Hood, after being nominated for two Oscars, and portraying the definitive Sherlock Holmes (at least until a certain Mr. Cumberbatch came along), he ended his career mostly hamming it out in drek. In the last decade of his life, he made films like Hillbillys in a Haunted House, The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini, and this rather silly sword and sandals fantasy. The Magic Sword is probably best known today as one of the many films ridiculed on Mystery Science Theater

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